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Law Notes

Reports to the Arkansas Bar by the Faculty of the University of Arkansas School of Law.

School of Law
1045 W. Maple St.
Robert A. Leflar Law Center
Waterman Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701

Phone: (479) 575-5601

Articles written by

Uché Ewelukwa Ofodile

Arkansas Bar Foundation Professor, University of Arkansas School of Law. Affiliate Faculty Member, African and African-American Studies Program, Fulbright College, University of Arkansas. Co-Chair, Committee on Investment & Development, American Bar Association Section of International Law (ABA-SIL). LL.B. (Nig.); LL.M. (London); LL.M. (Harvard); S.J.D. (Harvard).

Trading With Cuba: What is in it for Agribusinesses in Arkansas?

Without doubt, food and agricultural products will feature strongly in Cuba’s unfolding trade relations with the West and the rest of the world. With U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack predicting that U.S. trade with Cuba could rebound from its current $300 million to close to $500 million, agribusinesses in Arkansas stands to benefit. Although U.S. businesses already export some food and agricultural products to Cuba, normalized trade relations with the island nation has the potential to significantly boost economic exchanges between the two countries. This paper offers an assessment of the potential role of food and agriculture in Cuba’s external trade and foreign investment considerations.

Governor Hutchinson’s Trade Mission to Cuba: Key Legal and Policy Developments that the Arkansas Business Community Should be Aware Of

This article provides a broad overview of the state of play in the U.S.-Cuba diplomatic relations starting from December 17, 2014, when the landmark change in policy was announced. Subsequent articles will assess the implications of normalized trade relations with Cuba for food and agricultural companies in Arkansas, provide more detailed analysis of relevant regulations from the U.S. Department of State (“State Department”), the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”) and the U.S. Department of the Treasury (“Treasury”), and will offer more robust analysis of the legal aspects of a potential U.S.-Cuba trade and investment. Subsequent articles will also take a closer look at the risks involved in investing in Cuba and how businesses in Arkansas can mitigate those risks if and when they are allowed to enter the Cuban market. An analysis of the factors that prompted U.S.-Cuba rapprochement is beyond the scope of this article.

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